Tag Archives: Consumerism

BCBSDE website stupidity

BCBSDE advertisement

In this morning’s News-Journal  paper I see an advertisement for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Delaware’s website where it lists all the wonderful things you can do on it, like order a replacement ID card. 

When reading this, I had to let out a little chortle because last Sunday my wife and I were looking all over for her ID card and couldn’t find it. So we decided to go onto the BCBSDE.com website to get a replacement card ordered. 

After traversing their site, it left me shaking my head in disbelief. Do people who design websites ever try to use them?

Below I’ll show you the steps to go through to get a new ID card so you too can witness the stupidity. Just three steps will leave you too going “Huh?”

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Banned for life from Pathmark

Sometimes I’m amazed at some of the stupid things businesses do to drive away customers.  Here’s one for you, I’ve been banned for life from Pathmark, which happened back in 1972.  Pathmark is a regional grocery store chain, with a few stores in northern Delaware as well as up around the New York City area.

It all began with a gal I had a crush on in third grade named Patty Yearsley.

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SMS short codes and the evil that is M-cube

This post is to document frustrations I had removing a monthly charge from M-cube to my wife’s cell phone for $9.99 a month from the SMS short code of 44999. 

Now most sane people would just contact their cell phone provider and complain right away, but I’d figure I’d just do it the way you are supposed to do it, type STOP and be done with it.   OK, big mistake.

So five months later and five charges for 9.99 I think I finally got it resolved, but won’t know for sure until my next bill.

It all began with my bill in November…

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My last meal ever at Quiznos

My last quiznos meal   

My last Quiznos Meal

You are looking at the last meal I will ever buy at Quiznos. They did the unforgiveable, they switched from Coke products to that Pepsi sludge.

It’s no secret that both Pepsi and Coke work to get exclusive rights to provide their stuff in places like this, by providing “incentives” to the owners to switch. And of course, the people that run these places see dollar signs in their head and switch, thinking that most people don’t care  — and probably that is true — but not this person.

I can’t imagine what the Coke and Pepsi reps tell their customers when working a deal like this. Do they say “You won’t lose any customers because they don’t care?” If they say this, then they are admitting that their product is not so special.

Well, some people care. Nothing beats a nice cold Diet Coke. Diet Pepsi is horrible. It’s bad enough that it does influence my decision. There’s a Subway down the street, and by golly, they toast their stuff now, and they serve Coke products, so I’m switching. I even told the franchise owner I was switching after he told me he couldn’t sell Coke products due to the contract.

Now I’m sure Quiznos won’t care less that ole Weave is switching, and I’m sure they may pick up some diehard Pepsi losers, but that’s not the point. What happened to the customer is always right? What happened to giving the customer what they want? Why not provide them a choice?

WE DESERVE THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE OUR OWN BRAND OF FIZZY DRINK

I know places lose some revenue from doing exclusives. Is it more than the incentive, I don’t know. Is the loss of goodwill worth it? 7-Eleven certainly has both company’s products in their fountains, for example. And for a while, they were making a big deal about giving people a choice.

My employer “used” to have both brands available in our cafeteria, but they switched to an exclusive Pepsi arrangement a year or so ago. And you know what happened? They lose revenue cause of it. How can I make such a claim? Because from actual experience I know I and other Coke lovers now smuggle in our own supply. So instead of dropping $1.25 on a bottle of Diet Coke there a few times a day, I just bring in a 12 pack of my own. The company cafeteria operation now gets squat.

And if the pain of having to wash down my meatball sub with a Diet Pepsi wasn’t bad enough, to make matters worse, it wasn’t even an iTunes “free song” winner.